Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead

Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a tradition in Mexico based on both the Catholic All Souls and All Saints days, and older Aztec traditions. Day of the Dead is celebrated the first two days of November, and traditionally, families go to the graves to clean them, and to honor their ancestors and celebrate life. One of my favorite parts is the creation of little altars (“ofrendas”) for one’s departed souls. These are created in homes, and include little items the ancestor might like – a shot of tequila, a plate of tamales, or their favorite sweet.

Here are some of my favorite photographs from our Day of the Dead trip. In the next week, I’ll post memories of my own ancestors and what I’d put on their altars.

For an depth description of Día de los Muertos, see Gherkins and Tomatoes’ post.

Offerings for Day of the Dead, Mexico City

Marigold petals and corn. ©2006 Sue Mecklem

Family decorating grave

Family decorating grave. ©2006 Todd Mecklem

Skull Cakes

Skull Cakes. ©2006 Todd Mecklem

Cross made of marigold petals for Day of the Dead in Mexico City

Cross made of marigold petals for Day of the Dead. ©2006 Sue Mecklem

Day of the Dead, Mexico City cemetery

Decorated grave. ©2006 Sue Mecklem

Chocolate Skulls in Toluca, Mexico, 2006 by Todd Mecklem

Chocolate Skulls in Toluca, Mexico.©2006 Todd Mecklem

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Day of the Dead

My lack of discipline in posting regularly may well be the death of this blog. Note to self: write more, surf less.

Just for fun, I’m posting a photograph from one of my trips. I was in Mexico City two years ago for Day of the Dead, and came across this interesting display. There were a number of similar “mannequins” dressed in either white or black robes.

Cross Decorated for Dia de los Muertos, Mexico City

Cross Decorated for Dia de los Muertos, Mexico City